Tiger Woods says he’s talked with Casey Martin, who recently had his leg amputated

ORLANDO, Fla. – Tiger Woods was less than a year removed from his own bout with an injured leg and the possibility of amputation, so when he learned of Casey Martin’s plight there was a mix of both empathy and sympathy.

Martin, who played college golf at Stanford with Woods, suffered from Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome. Two years ago, he broke his right leg which led to the decision to amputate in October.

“We were all so thankful that the procedure turned out as well as it did. He didn’t lose as much of the femur as the doctors were thinking going into the procedure,” Woods said Saturday at the PNC Championship. “Still in rough shape. It still hurts quite a bit, but what he’s gone through his entire life and the amount of pain that he’s lived in daily, people have no idea how much pain that guy has lived in and how tough he is mentally and physically.”

Oregon men’s golf coach Casey Martin is recovering at a Rochester, Minnesota, hospital after undergoing an amputation of his right leg.

Full-field scores from the PNC Championship


Woods, who is playing his first competitive event in a year, was involved in a single-vehicle car crash in February outside of Los Angeles and needed multiple surgeries on his right leg.

“The leg was pretty messed up. I’m happy it’s still attached,” Woods said this week.

Martin, who sued the PGA Tour to use a golf cart in competition in 2001, has been the head golf coach at Oregon since 2006.

Adblock test (Why?)

‘TPC Impossible’: Toughest composite course on the PGA Tour in 2021

If you think golf is hard enough, you may want to pass on checking this course off of your bucket list.

Of course, we’re talking about “TPC Impossible,” which, as you probably can gather, is not a real course. There are no tee times available. No course rating or slope. No membership. All probably for the best.

What “TPC Impossible” is, though, is it’s actually a composite course of the most difficult holes, by number, on the PGA Tour in 2021. A par-68 layout measuring at over 7,600 yards and featuring no par-5s, six par-4s over 500 yards and absolutely zero birdie holes.

With a scoring average of more than six shots over par, it makes the Green Mile look like the Green Millimeter, the Bear Trap like the Bear Claw and Tiger proofing like Barkley proofing (sorry, Chuck!).

Forget playing it, you may even need an aspirin after reading this:

Course snapshot

Par: 34-34–68
Length: 3,736-3,894–7,630 yards
Scoring average: 36.58-37.502–74.082 (+6.082)


1 – TPC San Antonio (Oaks)

Par: 4
Length: 454 yards
Scoring average: 4.364

There’s no easing into the round with this hole. Jordan Spieth managed to play it in 1 under and bogey-free en route to winning the Valero Texas Open here last April. However, the hole also forced 26 double bogeys and five triples during the week. Less than 37% greens in regulation and less than 48% scrambling doesn’t typically equate to low scores.

Next toughest: Bay Hill, Par 4, 461 yards, 4.265


2 – Quail Hollow Club

Par: 4
Length: 452 yards
Scoring average: 4.233

Quail Hollow may be known for its difficult finishing holes, but it’s two of its early holes that make this scorecard, including the dogleg left, par-4 second, which boasted two triple bogeys and three times as many doubles (12) than the second toughest second hole, the par-3 second at Bay Hill. The green is this hole’s defense as it had the shortest average length of putt made (3’7″) during the Wells Fargo.

Next toughest: Bay Hill, Par 3, 231 yards, 3.214


3 – Quail Hollow Club

Par: 4
Length: 483 yards
Scoring average: 4.233

Staying in Charlotte, North Carolina, the par-4 third at Quail Hollow also saw 12 double bogeys this year while totaling 127 bogeys, 24 more than any other third hole in the past 12 months.

Next toughest: Ocean Course at Kiawah, Par 4, 390 yards, 4.204


4 – Accordia Golf Narashino CC

Par: 4
Length: 505 yards
Scoring average: 4.345

The Zozo Championship host keeps Augusta National from having four holes on this composite layout. Narashino’s par-4 fourth actually yielded the same amount of birdies as double bogeys (15). Sepp Straka played the hole in 5 over over the four rounds, making a double and one of three triples on the week.

Next toughest: Augusta National, Par 3, 240 yards, 3.304


5 – Augusta National

Par: 4
Length: 495 yards
Scoring average: 4.431

The recently lengthened par-4 fifth at Augusta National, “Magnolia,” is the hardest fifth hole, and it’s not close, as this year’s next hardest fifth hole, PGA National’s par-3 fifth, is nearly two-tenths of a shot over par easier. Xander Schauffele made double here, one of 14 scores of double or worse for the tournament, on Sunday as part of a 4-over, three-hole stretch. He lost by three shots to Hideki Matsuyama.

Next toughest: PGA National (Champions), Par 3, 217 yards, 3.276


6 – PGA West (Stadium)

Par: 3
Length: 223 yards
Scoring average: 3.235

Considering players teed it up on the Stadium Course just once in the first two rounds before the layout hosted solo on the weekend, 15 doubles and two triples is scary. Twenty balls found the water in four days, including two off the clubface of Erik van Rooyen, who doubled the hole in both weekend rounds.

Next toughest: Muirfield Village, Par 4, 455 yards, 4.212


7 – Augusta National

Par: 4
Length: 450 yards
Scoring average: 4.297

The third of four Augusta National holes on this course, “Pampas” yielded only 21 birdies last April, the lowest birdie total of any seventh hole this year.

Next toughest: Torrey Pines (South), Par 4, 462 yards, 4.228 (Farmers)


8 – PGA West (Nicklaus Tournament)

Par: 3
Length: 172 yards
Scoring average: 3.256

The American Express had quite the duo of treacherous par-3s, with Stadium’s sixth and Nicklaus Tournament’s eighth. Though players saw the hole just once the entire week, the eighth forced 15 doubles, three triples and, gulp, two quads. Four of the five others were made during the second round, where the scoring average was almost a half-shot over par.

Next toughest: Pebble Beach, Par 4, 428 yards, 4.221


9 – TPC Twin Cities

Par: 4
Length: 502 yards
Scoring average: 4.285

Almost to the turn, but not before playing a hole that saw 25 double bogeys, plus a triple by amateur Ryan Hall, at this year’s 3M Open. Eighteen balls went swimming, all on approach shots to this green guarded heavily by water. Winner Cameron Champ had little issue with the ninth, though, as he birdied it each of the first two days.

Next toughest: Congaree GC, Par 4, 510 yards, 4.273


10 – PGA National (Champion)

Par: 4
Length: 508 yards
Scoring average: 4.304

Twenty-seven birdies were made on the Champion’s back-nine opener during this year’s Honda Classic, though just one of those came during the final round (congrats, Stewart Cink). Players hit this green in regulation just 37.77% of the time in 72 holes.

Next toughest: Muirfield Village, Par 4, 472 yards, 4.261


11 – Augusta National

Par: 4
Length: 505 yards
Scoring average: 4.399

If Collin Morikawa was playing this composite layout, he’d likely skip this hole. He played “White Dogwood” in 5 over with two weekend doubles last April. Not that anyone had success there, as just 15 birdies were made in the most recent tournament.

Next toughest: Torrey Pines (South), Par 3, 222 yards, 3.393 (U.S. Open)


12 – Torrey Pines (South)

Par: 4
Length: 505 yards
Scoring average: 4.401 (Farmers)

Torrey Pines’ South Course might’ve hosted a U.S. Open this summer, but it’s place in this course isn’t represented by that championship. The par-4 12th for the Farmers Insurance Open averaged nearly as many doubles or worse as birdies. It’s just tough to hit the ball close here, evidenced by the hole’s average proximity of 51 feet, 8 inches for the tournament.

Next toughest: Torrey Pines (South), Par 4, 501 yards, 4.389 (U.S. Open)


13 – Congaree GC

Par: 4
Length: 465 yards
Scoring average: 4.361

With players trying to get the best angle into the green, which featured front pins on three of the four days, 23 tee balls were rinsed left of the fairway. In total, 25 double bogeys and six triples were made on the week. Chesson Hadley also bogeyed the 18th to finish a shot out of a potential playoff with winner Garrick Higgo.

Next toughest: Ocean Course at Kiawah, Par 4, 497 yards, 4.272


14 – Memorial Park GC

Par: 4
Length: 529 yards
Scoring average: 4.353

For a municipal course, this sure is a lengthy par-4. Players were barely over 20% in hitting this green in regulation on the weekend, as they were coming into the green with mainly long-irons, and they combined for just seven birdies in the final 36 holes. For the week, there were 143 bogeys, 12 doubles and three triples made here, yet there was also a hole-out eagle, by Luke List from 179 yards out.

Next toughest: Ocean Course at Kiawah, Par 3, 238 yards, 3.348


15 – Ocean Course at Kiawah

Par: 4
Length: 466 yards
Scoring average: 4.348

Kiawah’s back nine was the toughest of the year (+1.756) thanks to most holes playing into heavy winds. However, while scoring averages were also slightly skewed by the club professionals, it’s not like the club pros were the only ones responsible for the 24 doubles and four triples on the 15th hole. In fact, most of the biggest numbers were made by the Tour guys, including doubles by George Coetzee, Jason Scrivener and Peter Malnati. Tommy Fleetwood, Thomas Pieters and Victor Perez were responsible for one triple each.

Next toughest: Royal St. George’s, Par 4, 496 yards, 4.342


16 – Port Royal GC

Par: 3
Length: 235 yards
Scoring average: 3.341

The Butterfield Bermuda Championship claims a plot of land on this composite course (and boy, is it a beautiful piece), partly due to brutal playing conditions in this fall’s first round, where severe winds and rain wreaked havoc. But even without the assist from Mother Nature, this hole was plenty tough. It actually played to the same scoring average (+0.410) in each of the first two rounds, and the third round’s four birdies were fewer than the first round’s six. There was one triple in every round, and the second round even had a quad from Andres Romero.

Next toughest: El Camaleon GC, Par 4, 515 yards, 4.298


17 – Ocean Course at Kiawah

Par: 3
Length: 223 yards
Scoring average: 3.531

Featuring one of the most intimidating tee shots in golf thanks to Pete Dye digging an 8-acre lake right of this green and deep bunkers left, the Ocean Course’s 17th first earned its reputation at the 1991 Ryder Cup. “The hardest hole in the history of the universe,” David Feherty called it back then. Two decades later, it was the hardest at the PGA, yielding just three of 23 total birdies in the final round and causing 43 doubles, 12 triples, one quad and one smashed tee marker. Players found the green in regulation just 34.39% of the time and 40 balls were deposited in the manmade lake. Phil Mickelson bogeyed it twice, including on Sunday, during his record-breaking victory.

Next toughest: Quail Hollow, Par 3, 190 yards, 3.261


18 – Bay Hill

Par: 4
Length: 458 yards
Scoring average: 4.464

Blustery conditions for much of this year’s Arnold Palmer Invitational made this finishing hole even more demanding, especially on Sunday. Only 11 of 72 players in the final round hit the green in regulation, knocking the weekly average down almost below 30%. The scoring average for the 18th hole in that final round was slightly more than a shot over par. Harris English made the only birdie here on Sunday. For the tournament, the closing hole handed out 23 doubles (11 on Sunday), nine triples (five on Sunday) and one final-round quad by Luke List. Bryson DeChambeau played boldly to win that week, but he played safely at No. 18, making four straight pars.

Next toughest: Quail Hollow, Par 4, 494 yards, 4.456

Adblock test (Why?)

Highlights: Tiger, Charlie Woods finish second after 11-birdie run

Team Woods showed up at The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club on Sunday in Orlando, Florida, wearing matching red polos.

They quickly put some red on the scorecard – and often.

Tiger Woods and his son, Charlie, began their final round at the PNC Championship with two birdies and an eagle to take the solo lead after three holes before later rattling off 11 straight birdies and capping their tournament with a 15-under 57 for a second-place finish.

Tiger hit a nice wedge to 10 feet at the par-4 first and rolled in the birdie putt to kick off the scoring.

Charlie then got in on the birdie action, following another wedge approach by Tiger, sinking a 20-footer at the par-4 second.

Tiger hit a beautiful second shot into the par-5 third green, and Charlie again converted, the eagle make moving Team Woods to 14 under, a shot clear of the field.

After three straight pars, Tiger nearly jarred a pitch for eagle to secure the tap-in birdie.

A familiar scene this weekend was Charlie picking up his dad’s ball mark after holing a putt. He did so at the par-3 eighth, making a 12-footer for birdie.

And again a hole later after Tiger wedge to 10 feet.

Tiger got a good read from Charlie at No. 10, converting a lengthy birdie.

Charlie hit a nice short-iron into the par-4 11th green, but Tiger wedged one inside of him to set up an easy 5-foot birdie off dad’s putter.

There was a beautiful club twirl by Charlie at the par-3 12th, as his tee shot found the back of the green. Tiger then gave us a putter raise as he made a 12-foot birdie putt – and while Charlie started walking in his dad’s putt.

After a seventh straight birdie at No. 13, Tiger hit a good second shot at the par-5 14th just short of the green, and he then cozied a chip close for an eighth straight birdie.

Eight in a row came off the putter face of Charlie, from 18 feet, at No. 15.

The Woodses extended the birdie streak to double-digits at the par-4 16th thanks to Charlie’s unbelievable cut 4-iron to 5 feet.

Charlie wasn’t done, though, stuffing another long-iron at the par-3 17th to just a few feet. That made 11 straight birdies.

Tiger nearly holed an eagle chip at the par-5 closing hole, but it just missed, as did comeback putts by both players. Their closing 57 ended up a shot shy of the tournament record, and at 25 under, Team Woods fell two short of Team Daly, the winner.

Adblock test (Why?)

Despite only hitting three ‘golf shots’ in Rd. 1 of PNC, Tiger Woods shows progress

ORLANDO, Fla. – It had been a year since Tiger Woods had played tournament golf and even the 15-time major champion didn’t know what to expect on Day 1 at the PNC Championship.

But he knew he needed a good day off the tee from his son and forever teammate Charlie.

“I was hoping that Charlie would drive it as well as he did today so I didn’t have to hit as many, save me for the short shots and I can still hit short irons and I can still putt,” he admitted.

He also needed his body, a case study in modern medicine and determination, to do something it’s done just three times this year – hold up for 18 holes of golf.

The record will show Woods was playing in what he called a “hit-and-giggle,” riding in a golf cart with extremely low expectations. But considering how far he’s come in the 10 painful months since he severely damaged his right leg in a single-vehicle crash near Los Angeles, there were still so many more questions than answers.

To be exact, Woods said he hit exactly three “golf shots” on Saturday at the Ritz-Carlton Golf Club. That’s three out of a combined 62 that his team needed to finish the day tied for fifth place, just three shots off the tee.


Full-field scores from the PNC Championship


There was the 4-iron from 220 yards at the par-5 third hole that stopped 18 feet behind the hole.

“That 4-iron he hit into [No.] 3 today that was just ridiculous,” said Justin Thomas, who was paired with Team Woods on Saturday. “I looked at him and as soon as he sat in the cart, he just kind of looked at me and smiles and I knew exactly that that’s the kind of shots that he hits when he’s healthy.”

There was another solid second shot at the par-5 14th hole and then there was a 7-iron at the par-3 17th hole that had Woods talking golf like it was 2000.

“I didn’t believe I could get it there but it was one of my old shots, so to be able to turn that thing down and hit that thing and squeeze it out there like that was nice, even though it wasn’t pin-high, but just the shot, the feel and the shape is what I was seeing,” he smiled.


Tiger sinks birdie at No. 10 in PNC first round

Tiger sinks birdie at No. 10 in PNC first round

If three shots out of 62 – keeping in mind that 12-year-old Charlie brilliantly carried the team off the tee – isn’t exactly what we’ve come to expect from the 82-time Tour winner, know that whatever comes from this week’s one-off cameo will be enough.

Even in the December twilight, Woods tried to temper expectations – be it external or otherwise – about his future. He has been relatively consistent here: Wherever his rebuilt right leg takes him, he will be at peace.

He’s been consistent on this from the outset, if this is the end of his competitive days that’s fine, but on Saturday there were three slivers of daylight. Actually, there were four reasons to be optimistic that this “challenge” season event is more than the sum of its hit-and-giggle parts.

If this comeback is bound for more glory it will be those three “shots” and a single drive at the par-4 11th hole that started it all. Woods has talked repeatedly about not having his “speed” and hitting the ball much shorter than he normally would, but that wasn’t the case at No. 11 when his drive bounded past Thomas’ best.

“He hit it past me on 11. I hit it pretty good and as his ball took that big bounce we looked at each other and I was like, oh, if it’s going to happen, it’s going to be this one because I think it just launched and yeah, that was a shot to the ego,” Thomas admitted. “He really didn’t need to say anything. I was just so embarrassed that he hit it past me that that was enough.”

That’s it, three “shots” and a priceless drive. For Woods, that’s progress.

Adblock test (Why?)

10 must-have gift items that PGA Tour players would want for the holidays

As a rule, PGA Tour players would have to be among the hardest groups to find a Christmas gift for. Most are millionaires, play golf for a living and probably haven’t paid for a golf ball (or anything else golf-related) in decades.

There are, however, “must-have” items with widely varying price points that even a Tour type would appreciate. In no particular order, here are our top 10 list of gifts for Tour players:


TrackMan. This is the gold standard among the play-for-pay types but depending on the model it’s likely not an option for most.

“If someone is buying me a TrackMan that’d be a great start. If you have $20,000 laying around and want to throw it my way, absolutely,” Chesson Hadley laughed.

If you’ve got the means a 20 grand stocking stuffer always works, but if not the launch monitor business has plenty of price points.


ForeSight Sports GCQuad. The GCQuad provides everything from clubhead speed and club path to loft and lie information at impact. It also, at least according to various online quotes, comes with a slightly more reasonable price tag ($11,000 to $14,000) than the TrackMan.

“That’s my favorite thing because it gives me numbers without wind and the current temperature and elevation. It’s portable and gives me a bunch of data that I really like,” Brendan Steele said. “You really know how far you’re hitting it.”


Formewear. After launch monitors, the most popular items on Tour have everything to do with therapy and fitness and one of the most interesting items on the market are the shirts and shorts from Formewear, which are designed to improve posture and relieve stress.

“Our products address the tension in the back, hips and neck, not only from the golf swing but from traveling and the lack of recovery week after week,” said Dr. Stephen Liu, the founder and chairman of Forme. “Our product is designed to relax those muscles in the neck and along the spine so they have faster recovery and less issues with their neck and back. It also gives you more mobility in the upper spine.”


Theragun. The Tour announced a partnership with Therabody last year and the company’s Theragun product line – from the pro series to the mini – can now be found on every tournament practice area with prices that range from $199 to $449.

If you really want to impress a hard-to-buy-for Tour player, the RecoveryAir System features leg sleeves with a pneumatic compression system for $499.


TriggerPoint foam roller. Again, this is a must-have for any elite athlete even a Tour player who has access to the circuit’s mobile fitness vans and the world’s best trainers.

Models range from the basic GRID foam roller (suggested retail $35) to the more advanced URBNFit Vibrating model ($69).


Stretching pole. The basic model has evolved over the years but the concept of increased flexibility and mobility has been perfected by the Randy Myers Golf Stretching Pole.

The standard model is $125 while the Tour model allows for more stretching options, including a spring handle so that players can set a proper angle at the top of their backswing, for $175.


Range finder. There is no shortage of options here but a consensus favorite among Tour players, as well as their caddies, is Bushnell Golf’s Tour V5 Shift Patriot Park ($374).

Along with the accuracy of this model the unit’s “slope compensation” makes it crucial for practice rounds and tournament preparation. If all that wasn’t enough a portion of the proceeds from every Tour V5 Shift are also donated to the Folds of Honor.


Fitness bands. This is one area of golf fitness that has evolved and improved. Although most bands will work, for a Tour-specific workout the Joey D [Diovisalvi] Signature Series PowerBandz ($59) are popular at the highest levels.

The set includes two 4-inch bands and an anchor that allows the bands to be secured in a door jam or onto a golf cart for both a workout or pre-round warm-up.


Whoop. The data that’s produced from the wearable Whoop device has been integrated into various tournament telecasts to provide a snapshot of a player’s biometric information at crucial moments during play. It’s also become something of a staple for the game’s top players to better understand how their bodies react to pressure.

“I really like looking [at Whoop data] after tournaments to see what my heart rate was like,” Justin Thomas told PGATour.com. “I can get a specific look and be like, ‘Why did it go from 110 to 140? What was going on?’”


Alignment sticks. Again, there are plenty of options to choose from here and the basic concept remains true after all these years, but for the Tour player, there is something to be said for ease of travel.

The Callaway Alignment Stix combines both function and form, with the 48-inch sticks collapsing for easier storage and a bright yellow finish that makes them impossible to ignore ($19).

Adblock test (Why?)

Davis Love III’s mother, Penta, dies at age 94 following lengthy battle after stroke

Penta B. Love, the mother of World Golf Hall of Fame player Davis Love III and widow of renowned swing coach Davis Love Jr., died Monday. She was 94.

“While everyone in our family is saddened at the loss of our family leader, we are blessed with so many great memories and rejoice that our faith tells us she is at peace eternally,” Davis Love III said in a statement. “We’re very thankful for her caregivers and to those in the Golden Isles and golf community for the love and support they have shown us.”

Penta Love was born in Alexis, North Carolina, but moved with her family to St. Simons Island, Georgia, when her husband was hired to be the teaching professional at Sea Island Resort. Davis Love Jr. died in a plane crash in 1988.

Love is survived by her sons, Davis III and Mark, and their families.

Adblock test (Why?)

Watch: Tiger Woods captivated by video of he and son Charlie’s similarities

Like father, like son.

Before his return to competition at the PNC Championship, where he’ll again team up with his 12-year-old son, Charlie, Tiger Woods sat down to watch some highlights of he and Charlie from last year’s event at The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club in Orlando, Florida.

Only these weren’t your typical highlights. Instead, PGA Tour’s social team spliced together some side-by-side video showing just how alike the Woods father-son duo are, from their swings to their mannerisms.

“Two things that stick out,” Woods noted, “the timing of the twirls and the pickup of the tee.”

Woods also pointed out “the nose thing that we have.”

“We both have allergies, so we both struggle on the golf course,” Woods added. “We get like wind blowing or we’re sniffing, just that little thing that we both have.”

Woods told Golf Digest recently that Charlie had a growth spurt, so when the young Woods shows up in Orlando this week, he could resemble his legendary father even more.

Adblock test (Why?)

Lee Trevino chats up Tiger and Charlie Woods, shares most feared shot

Who was a better ball-striker: Tiger Woods or Lee Trevino? You can’t go wrong either way and both had praise for the other on Friday at the PNC Championship.

Trevino was chatting it up on the range – as Trevino does – at the Ritz-Carlton in Orlando, Florida, with Woods and his son, Charlie.

“OK, this is a wedge shot,” Trevino said to Charlie, punching a driver with wedge distance. “A little wedge shot that is. This is – [Tiger] does all that. I’m telling [Charlie], the greatest ball-striker is right there.”

“Oh, come on,” Tiger Woods said.

“He had power,” replied Trevino.

“You’re the best I’ve ever seen,” said Tiger.

The two legends, who have combined for 21 major titles, continued to chat and joke and talk about the swing, with Trevino sharing his most feared shot.

“The most fear, the most fear ever, on a par 5, was a 50-yard shot with the pin on the right, with water … right there,” Trevino said. 

Trevino and Woods then both discussed how they’d hit the shot. Check it out below:

Adblock test (Why?)

Phil Mickelson will start 2022 ending a 21-year hiatus at Sentry Tournament of Champions

Phil Mickelson will ring in the new year by ending a 21-year hiatus.

The 51-year-old will end his two-decade-long lull by exercising his invitation to join the winners-only field at the Sentry Tournament of Champions in Hawaii after he became the oldest player to ever win a major at the PGA Championship in May. 

Despite notching a PGA Tour win every year but 2003 between 2000-2013, the last time Lefty played in the Sentry Tournament of Champions was 13 months into the new millennium in January 2001. 

“We’re absolutely thrilled to welcome Phil Mickelson back to Kapalua, as his return adds additional star power to an incredibly deep and talented field,” said Alex Urban, the event’s executive director. 

Mickelson won the event twice back when it was played at La Costa Resort and Spa in Carlsbad, California. In 1994 he beat Fred Couples in a playoff and in ’98 he edged out Tiger Woods and Mark O’Meara by one shot. 

As O’Meara and Couples have become stars of yesteryear and Woods’ glory days appear to be behind him, Mickelson will look to start off his 31st year on Tour by notching a 46th victory against the sport’s stars of today such as Jon Rahm, Collin Morikawa, Brooks Koepka, Hideki Matsuyama and Bryson DeChambeau, just as he did on Kiawah Island. 

Adblock test (Why?)

‘TPC Impossible’: Toughest composite course on the PGA Tour in 2021

If you think golf is hard enough, you may want to pass on checking this course off of your bucket list.

Of course, we’re talking about “TPC Impossible,” which, as you probably can gather, is not a real course. There are no tee times available. No course rating or slope. No membership. All probably for the best.

What “TPC Impossible” is, though, is it’s actually a composite course of the most difficult holes, by number, on the PGA Tour in 2021. A par-68 layout measuring at over 7,600 yards and featuring no par-5s, six par-4s over 500 yards and absolutely zero birdie holes.

With a scoring average of more than six shots over par, it makes the Green Mile look like the Green Millimeter, the Bear Trap like the Bear Claw and Tiger proofing like Barkley proofing (sorry, Chuck!).

Forget playing it, you may even need an aspirin after reading this:

Course snapshot

Par: 34-34–68
Length: 3,736-3,894–7,630 yards
Scoring average: 36.58-37.502–74.082 (+6.082)


1 – TPC San Antonio (Oaks)

Par: 4
Length: 454 yards
Scoring average: 4.364

There’s no easing into the round with this hole. Jordan Spieth managed to play it in 1 under and bogey-free en route to winning the Valero Texas Open here last April. However, the hole also forced 26 double bogeys and five triples during the week. Less than 37% greens in regulation and less than 48% scrambling doesn’t typically equate to low scores.

Next toughest: Bay Hill, Par 4, 461 yards, 4.265


2 – Quail Hollow Club

Par: 4
Length: 452 yards
Scoring average: 4.233

Quail Hollow may be known for its difficult finishing holes, but it’s two of its early holes that make this scorecard, including the dogleg left, par-4 second, which boasted two triple bogeys and three times as many doubles (12) than the second toughest second hole, the par-3 second at Bay Hill. The green is this hole’s defense as it had the shortest average length of putt made (3’7″) during the Wells Fargo.

Next toughest: Bay Hill, Par 3, 231 yards, 3.214


3 – Quail Hollow Club

Par: 4
Length: 483 yards
Scoring average: 4.233

Staying in Charlotte, North Carolina, the par-4 third at Quail Hollow also saw 12 double bogeys this year while totaling 127 bogeys, 24 more than any other third hole in the past 12 months.

Next toughest: Ocean Course at Kiawah, Par 4, 390 yards, 4.204


4 – Accordia Golf Narashino CC

Par: 4
Length: 505 yards
Scoring average: 4.345

The Zozo Championship host keeps Augusta National from having four holes on this composite layout. Narashino’s par-4 fourth actually yielded the same amount of birdies as double bogeys (15). Sepp Straka played the hole in 5 over over the four rounds, making a double and one of three triples on the week.

Next toughest: Augusta National, Par 3, 240 yards, 3.304


5 – Augusta National

Par: 4
Length: 495 yards
Scoring average: 4.431

The recently lengthened par-4 fifth at Augusta National, “Magnolia,” is the hardest fifth hole, and it’s not close, as this year’s next hardest fifth hole, PGA National’s par-3 fifth, is nearly two-tenths of a shot over par easier. Xander Schauffele made double here, one of 14 scores of double or worse for the tournament, on Sunday as part of a 4-over, three-hole stretch. He lost by three shots to Hideki Matsuyama.

Next toughest: PGA National (Champions), Par 3, 217 yards, 3.276


6 – PGA West (Stadium)

Par: 3
Length: 223 yards
Scoring average: 3.235

Considering players teed it up on the Stadium Course just once in the first two rounds before the layout hosted solo on the weekend, 15 doubles and two triples is scary. Twenty balls found the water in four days, including two off the clubface of Erik van Rooyen, who doubled the hole in both weekend rounds.

Next toughest: Muirfield Village, Par 4, 455 yards, 4.212


7 – Augusta National

Par: 4
Length: 450 yards
Scoring average: 4.297

The third of four Augusta National holes on this course, “Pampas” yielded only 21 birdies last April, the lowest birdie total of any seventh hole this year.

Next toughest: Torrey Pines (South), Par 4, 462 yards, 4.228 (Farmers)


8 – PGA West (Nicklaus Tournament)

Par: 3
Length: 172 yards
Scoring average: 3.256

The American Express had quite the duo of treacherous par-3s, with Stadium’s sixth and Nicklaus Tournament’s eighth. Though players saw the hole just once the entire week, the eighth forced 15 doubles, three triples and, gulp, two quads. Four of the five others were made during the second round, where the scoring average was almost a half-shot over par.

Next toughest: Pebble Beach, Par 4, 428 yards, 4.221


9 – TPC Twin Cities

Par: 4
Length: 502 yards
Scoring average: 4.285

Almost to the turn, but not before playing a hole that saw 25 double bogeys, plus a triple by amateur Ryan Hall, at this year’s 3M Open. Eighteen balls went swimming, all on approach shots to this green guarded heavily by water. Winner Cameron Champ had little issue with the ninth, though, as he birdied it each of the first two days.

Next toughest: Congaree GC, Par 4, 510 yards, 4.273


10 – PGA National (Champion)

Par: 4
Length: 508 yards
Scoring average: 4.304

Twenty-seven birdies were made on the Champion’s back-nine opener during this year’s Honda Classic, though just one of those came during the final round (congrats, Stewart Cink). Players hit this green in regulation just 37.77% of the time in 72 holes.

Next toughest: Muirfield Village, Par 4, 472 yards, 4.261


11 – Augusta National

Par: 4
Length: 505 yards
Scoring average: 4.399

If Collin Morikawa was playing this composite layout, he’d likely skip this hole. He played “White Dogwood” in 5 over with two weekend doubles last April. Not that anyone had success there, as just 15 birdies were made in the most recent tournament.

Next toughest: Torrey Pines (South), Par 3, 222 yards, 3.393 (U.S. Open)


12 – Torrey Pines (South)

Par: 4
Length: 505 yards
Scoring average: 4.401 (Farmers)

Torrey Pines’ South Course might’ve hosted a U.S. Open this summer, but it’s place in this course isn’t represented by that championship. The par-4 12th for the Farmers Insurance Open averaged nearly as many doubles or worse as birdies. It’s just tough to hit the ball close here, evidenced by the hole’s average proximity of 51 feet, 8 inches for the tournament.

Next toughest: Torrey Pines (South), Par 4, 501 yards, 4.389 (U.S. Open)


13 – Congaree GC

Par: 4
Length: 465 yards
Scoring average: 4.361

With players trying to get the best angle into the green, which featured front pins on three of the four days, 23 tee balls were rinsed left of the fairway. In total, 25 double bogeys and six triples were made on the week. Chesson Hadley also bogeyed the 18th to finish a shot out of a potential playoff with winner Garrick Higgo.

Next toughest: Ocean Course at Kiawah, Par 4, 497 yards, 4.272


14 – Memorial Park GC

Par: 4
Length: 529 yards
Scoring average: 4.353

For a municipal course, this sure is a lengthy par-4. Players were barely over 20% in hitting this green in regulation on the weekend, as they were coming into the green with mainly long-irons, and they combined for just seven birdies in the final 36 holes. For the week, there were 143 bogeys, 12 doubles and three triples made here, yet there was also a hole-out eagle, by Luke List from 179 yards out.

Next toughest: Ocean Course at Kiawah, Par 3, 238 yards, 3.348


15 – Ocean Course at Kiawah

Par: 4
Length: 466 yards
Scoring average: 4.348

Kiawah’s back nine was the toughest of the year (+1.756) thanks to most holes playing into heavy winds. However, while scoring averages were also slightly skewed by the club professionals, it’s not like the club pros were the only ones responsible for the 24 doubles and four triples on the 15th hole. In fact, most of the biggest numbers were made by the Tour guys, including doubles by George Coetzee, Jason Scrivener and Peter Malnati. Tommy Fleetwood, Thomas Pieters and Victor Perez were responsible for one triple each.

Next toughest: Royal St. George’s, Par 4, 496 yards, 4.342


16 – Port Royal GC

Par: 3
Length: 235 yards
Scoring average: 3.341

The Butterfield Bermuda Championship claims a plot of land on this composite course (and boy, is it a beautiful piece), partly due to brutal playing conditions in this fall’s first round, where severe winds and rain wreaked havoc. But even without the assist from Mother Nature, this hole was plenty tough. It actually played to the same scoring average (+0.410) in each of the first two rounds, and the third round’s four birdies were fewer than the first round’s six. There was one triple in every round, and the second round even had a quad from Andres Romero.

Next toughest: El Camaleon GC, Par 4, 515 yards, 4.298


17 – Ocean Course at Kiawah

Par: 3
Length: 223 yards
Scoring average: 3.531

Featuring one of the most intimidating tee shots in golf thanks to Pete Dye digging an 8-acre lake right of this green and deep bunkers left, the Ocean Course’s 17th first earned its reputation at the 1991 Ryder Cup. “The hardest hole in the history of the universe,” David Feherty called it back then. Two decades later, it was the hardest at the PGA, yielding just three of 23 total birdies in the final round and causing 43 doubles, 12 triples, one quad and one smashed tee marker. Players found the green in regulation just 34.39% of the time and 40 balls were deposited in the manmade lake. Phil Mickelson bogeyed it twice, including on Sunday, during his record-breaking victory.

Next toughest: Quail Hollow, Par 3, 190 yards, 3.261


18 – Bay Hill

Par: 4
Length: 458 yards
Scoring average: 4.464

Blustery conditions for much of this year’s Arnold Palmer Invitational made this finishing hole even more demanding, especially on Sunday. Only 11 of 72 players in the final round hit the green in regulation, knocking the weekly average down almost below 30%. The scoring average for the 18th hole in that final round was slightly more than a shot over par. Harris English made the only birdie here on Sunday. For the tournament, the closing hole handed out 23 doubles (11 on Sunday), nine triples (five on Sunday) and one final-round quad by Luke List. Bryson DeChambeau played boldly to win that week, but he played safely at No. 18, making four straight pars.

Next toughest: Quail Hollow, Par 4, 494 yards, 4.456

Adblock test (Why?)